Talk to Frank resources-for-family

About Talk To Frank

The longest running anti-drug campaign in the UK is Talk to Frank. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. People were seriously warned to stay away from the drug peddlers around sports arenas and that they could be destroyed by drugs. Instead, wit and fun including games were embraced.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. There was also a new message Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. The idea was to build a reliable "older brother" image that could provide advice to teenagers about banned substances. To become a familiar brand with youth in the UK, the Frank label has presented everything from the adventures of pablo the drug mule to a tour of a brain warehouse.


Significantly, Frank was never found in the flesh, so would never be the objective of joke for wearing the wrong trainers or attempting to be "down with the children," says Justin Tindall, inventive director of ad organization Leo Burnett. Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. One more thing that distinguishes Frank from other government-funded campaigns is that nothing links the ad to the government in anyway whatsoever.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


Frank has set the standard, and now most adverts in Europe are using the same format to equip the youth with unbiased facts to help in making their choices. In nations with solid punishments for ownership, pictures of jail bars and disgraced guardians are still typical. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

In the United States of America, the federal government has spent millions of dollars on a long-running campaign, Above the Influence, that sells positive possibilities to using substances by making use of a combination of funny and cautionary stories. The stress is on chatting to youngsters by using their language - one advertisement depicts a group of "stoners" forsaken on a couch. But the scare tactics is still prevalent in majority of the campaigns against drugs around the globe, especially the "descent into hell" which is drug inspired. One typical example was a part of the Canadian DrugsNot4Me program showed an attractive, confident young woman then into a wasting, hollow eyes shadow at the hand of drugs.

Research that was done on a UK anti-drug campaign between 1999 and 2004 shows that describing the negative effects of abuse will often actually encourage young people "on the margins of society" to use drugs.


Frank made brand new ground - and received a lot of criticism from the conservative opposition politicians at that time - for being brave enough to put forward that substances might provide highs and lows.


Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

Understanding the true information behind the message was very difficult. The person behind this cocaine ad has said that he now thinks he thought the average person browsing the web had a longer attention span. A few people might have stayed around for the animation's end to discover more regarding the undesirable effects. However, the goal of the ad was to be upfront with young people about the effects of drugs so that Frank could establish some accountability.

One survey said that 67 percent of young people would call Frank if they needed advice about drugs. Frank helpline received 225,892 phone calls and 3,341,777 hits on the website in the period 2011-2012. These figures provide proof that the Frank approach bears results.

Though the response is good, it is no evidence that Frank just like other available anti-drug campaigns has discouraged people from indulging in drugs.

Substance use in the United Kingdom has decreased by 9% in the ten years since the campaign was introduced, though the pros say a lot of this is because of a decline in the use of cannabis use, probably connected to younger people's changing attitudes towards smoking tobacco.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK is a nationwide drug education programme designed and run by the British government's Department of Health in collaboration with the Home Office in 2003. It's main aim is to inform young people about the dangers of alcohol and drugs, so as to bring down the rate of consumption of both legal and illegal drugs. It has had several media campaigns on the Internet and the radio.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Services

FRANK gives the accompanying services to individuals who look for data and/or advice regarding drugs

  • A website
  • A private phone number that is available round-the-clock
  • Email
  • A live private chat service that's available from 2 pm - 6 pm every day
  • A facility to find counselling besides management